Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

Writing: 4/5 Plot: 4/5 Characters: 5/5

A captivating book weaving together themes of family, opportunity, and morality as a Cameroonian immigrant family tries to find their American Dream in New York City.

Jende Jonga has just landed a plum job as chauffer to Clark Edwards, a senior exec at Lehman Brothers. His wife Neni helps Clark’s wife Cindy at home while pursuing her dream of becoming a pharmacist by taking classes at the local college. All appears to be going well, but it is 2008 and Lehman Brothers is heading for a fall. At the same time, the Jonga’s immigration tangle is becoming ever more labyrinthian.

Told in alternating chapters from Jende and Neni’s perspective, the author paints a thorough picture of an immigrant family and their motivations and interactions with a new world. The interplay between the Jongas and the Edwardses is a fascinating combination of the meeting of cultures and of specific individuals within the culture. Lots of reflection and insight into behavior which is what I look for. I love the way this book brings to light how ethical behavior is defined by individuals depending on their situation and personal priorities.

I don’t want to give away the ending — suffice it to say there is a lot of potential discussion topics for any good book club! The American Dream — the importance of family — the role of women — the morality of a given situation.

Great for fans of Exit, West.

Good Riddance by Elinor Lipman

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. The book will be published on Feb 5, 2019

Writing: 3 Plot: 3 Characters: 3.5

Daphne Maritch inherits one thing from her recently deceased mother: a 1968 High School Yearbook with regularly updated snarky marginalia. Newly divorced and living in a postage-stamp sized apartment in New York City, she tosses the tome and focusses on her “recovery project” — a course in chocolate making. However, thoroughly obnoxious neighbor, Geneva Wisenkorn, has another plan. Purporting to be documentary film maker (her main claim to fame is a Matzoh docudrama), Geneva has latched on to the yearbook (procured through dumpster-diving) as her path to fame and fortune. Thoroughly horrified, Daphne spends the book alternating between the shocking discoveries unearthed and trying to keep those discoveries quiet. She is helped by her father — whose move to New York fulfills a life long dream — and hunky across-the-hall neighbor, Jeremy, who plays a small part in the successful series Riverdale.

Entertaining and reasonably well-written with great humor. The plot is a little thin, and the characters are a little too stereotyped for my taste. We find out at the end that it’s really a (happy) love story though it doesn’t read that way from the start. I would have been a little happier if our heroine found something she actually wanted to do with her life rather than just find a boyfriend … but that was not to be.